Fostering a Vibrant Canadian Programming Market: Michael Geist's CRTC Submission Focusing on Net Neutrality and Rejecting New Taxes, Fees or Content Blocking

Fostering a Vibrant Canadian Programming Market: Michael Geist's CRTC Submission Focusing on Net Neutrality and Rejecting New Taxes, Fees or Content Blocking
Posted on January 6, 2018 | Michael Geist | Written on December 19, 2017
Comments
Letter type:
Blog Post

Publisher

Publisher:
MichaelGeist.ca

Last month I posted on the responses to the CRTC’s consultation on the future of Canadian programming, which yielded over 200 submissions that envision extensive Internet regulation and taxation. The CRTC has published a reference document for the second stage of its consultation that runs until January 31, 2018.  My full submission for the first stage of the consultation can be found here.

I argue that the existing Canadian system is working well with significant new foreign investment in Canadian programming replacing declining investment from traditional sources such as broadcasters. Moreover, the audio market is experiencing remarkable growth with Internet streaming revenues in Canada far outpacing that found in many other countries.

With the market enjoying great success, I argue that the appropriate regulatory response should emphasize the ongoing shift to a digital market for audio and video programming by supporting regulations that foster increased global competitiveness of Canadian services and creators. These includes prioritizing affordable Internet access, a strong affirmation of net neutrality, the removal of outdated regulations that foster a “walled garden” style approach in Canada, and a rejection of new taxes, fees or content blocking schemes. The full submission is available here.

About The Author

Dr. Michael Geist is a law professor at the University of Ottawa where he holds the Canada Research Chair in Internet and E-commerce Law. He has obtained a Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.) degree from Osgoode Hall Law School... More

comments powered by Disqus